Spartan Pre-Workout Dynamic Stretch – Demo

Spartan Dynamic Stretch Warm-Up Routine The Dynamic warm up incorporates flexibility, co-ordination and balance along with muscle/joint awareness. It starts from the ground up targeting the ankles, knees, hips and trunk. Once the body is primed and blood starts to flow we target the upper body, core, shoulder, elbows and wrists. Make sure to incorporate this warm up before all workouts and activities for maximum results, flexibility and help to stay injury free. Spartan Dynamic Warm Up Stretch Routine – Demo Spartan Dynamic Stretch – Perform after Dynamic Warm Up – 10 minutes Set your Gymboss Timer for 30 seconds intervals and perform each exercise one after the other for one round and follow up with the Spartan Workout of the Day 1. Toe and Heel Lifts 2. Foot Circles 3. Knee Circles 4. Hip Circles 5. Spinal Rotations (side to side swings) 6. Lateral Side Flexion 7. Arm Circles 8. Chest Breast Stake 9. Reverse Stroke 10. Elbow Circles 11. Wrist Circles 12. Finger Waves 13. Knee Extension Squats 14. Side Lunges Methods of Stretches There are different types of stretches that can be used and not all are created equal. I think it is important to get a brief understanding of the different stretches that can be used. Dynamic: involves controlled movements through a full range of motion by moving parts of your body and gradually increasing reach and speed of the movement. Dynamic stretching improves flexibility and is done after a warm up to reduce the risk of injury. Static: involves lengthening a muscle or muscle group to extend its range of motion and then holding it. These stretches are held steadily, stretching to the farthest point you comfortably can for between 20-60 seconds. Static stretching needs to be performed when the muscle is warm and is done after the training or workout session. Ballistic: Ballistic stretching uses bouncing; rebounding and the momentum of a moving body or force the limb into an extended range of motion. This is stretching, or “warming up”, by bouncing in and out of a stretched position, using the stretched muscles as a spring which pulls you out of the stretched position. This type of stretching is very risky and should not be used without supervision of a knowledgeable trainer. Active: this is stretching without an aid. This is a type of static stretching; you stretch one muscle by contracting the opposing muscle. An active stretch is one where you assume a position and then hold it there with no assistance other than using the strength of your antagonist muscles. Passive: This is a type of static stretching that involves a partner that will assist in moving the limb into the new position. A passive stretch is one where you assume a position and hold it with some other part of your body, or with the assistance of a partner or some other apparatus. Isometric: is a type of static stretch in which you tense a muscle in order to reduce tension in it. This involves the resistance of muscle groups through isometric contractions (tensing) of the stretched muscles. The use of isometric stretching is one of the fastest ways to develop increased flexibility and is more effective than either passive stretching or active stretching alone. PNF (Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation): is a stretching technique that combines stretching and contracting the muscle. PNF stretching is currently the fastest and most effective way known to increase static-passive flexibility. It is not really a type of stretching but is a technique of combining passive and isometric stretching (see section Isometric Stretching) in order to achieve maximum static flexibility.  

Spartan Dynamic Warm Up Routines – Follow Alongs

Spartan Dynamic Warm Ups A proper warm-up is critical for optimal performance. By using this warm up your flexibility is increased and joints strengthened and prepared to perform. You will also improve your coordination. Your warm up is about the quality if work so begin at a higher quality and lower intensity level. The Spartan Dynamic warm-ups take 5 minutes. At first you may find it difficult to complete the routine but as you improve you will find it easier to get through. Dynamic Warm Up Routine #1 Dynamic Warm Up Routine #2 Spartan Dynamic Warm Up Before beginning any workouts your body must be prepared to handle the stress and intensity you will place on it.  Warming up your muscles as well as preparing your body for the hard work out is vital before any session.  Your body, joints and muscles take a bit of a beating each workout and if you are not prepared you will not have an effective workout or may sustain injuries. The first are a set of light exercisers to get the blood flowing through your body and muscles warmed up.  Studies have shown that performing an active warm-up prior to either training or physical activity can improve performance by as much as 6%!. Spartan Dynamic Warm Up #1 This is a 4 minute routine. Set your Gymboss Timer for 30 seconds intervals and perform each exercise one after the other for one round and follow up with the Dynamic Warm Up. 1. Jumping jacks 2. Seal Jacks 3. Pogo Hops 4. Front and Back – Skiers 5. Side to Side 6. Twists 7. Crossover Jacks 8. Side Knee Lifts Spartan Dynamic Warm Up #2 This is a 4 minute routine. Set your Gymboss Timer for 30 seconds intervals and perform each exercise one after the other for one round and follow up with the Dynamic Warm Up. 1. Jumping Jacks 2. Seal Jacks 3. Crossover Jacks 4. Pogo Hops (Skipping) 5. Running on the Spot 6. Bodyweight Squats 7. High Kicks – 5 per side 8. Knee Lifts – Opposite Knee to Elbow Warm Up and Stretches Both warming up before and stretching after each workout will be instrumental in your staying injury free and performing at peak levels. Many people tend to forget or leave stretching completely out of their training regimen. But this missed component of training can hinder your progress. In as little as 5-10 minutes before and after your workout stretching is tremendously effective in its ability to reinforce proper muscle length and joint integrity. Incorporating both the warm up and stretch is essential to an effective Spartacus or Spartan Workouts and MMA Training. Leaving this out is a surefire way to end up out of the gym and on the injury shelf. Methods of Stretches There are different types of stretches that can be used and not all are created equal. In the STS program we will be focusing on Dynamic Stretching before the workout and Static Stretching for after your workout. I think it is still important to get a brief understanding of the different stretches that can be used. Dynamic: involves controlled movements through a full range of motion by moving parts of your body and gradually increasing reach and speed of the movement. Dynamic stretching improves flexibility and is done after a warm up to reduce the risk of injury. Static: involves lengthening a muscle or muscle group to extend its range of motion and then holding it. These stretches are held steadily, stretching to the farthest point you comfortably can for between 20-60 seconds. Static stretching needs to be performed when the muscle is warm and is done after the training or workout session. Ballistic: Ballistic stretching uses bouncing; rebounding and the momentum of a moving body or force the limb into an extended range of motion. This is stretching, or “warming up”, by bouncing in and out of a stretched position, using the stretched muscles as a spring which pulls you out of the stretched position. This type of stretching is very risky and should not be used without supervision of a knowledgeable trainer. Active: this is stretching without an aid. This is a type of static stretching; you stretch one muscle by contracting the opposing muscle. An active stretch is one where you assume a position and then hold it there with no assistance other than using the strength of your antagonist muscles. Passive: This is a type of static stretching that involves a partner that will assist in moving the limb into the new position. A passive stretch is one where you assume a position and hold it with some other part of your body, or with the assistance of a partner or some other apparatus. Isometric: is a type of static stretch in which you tense a muscle in order to reduce tension in it. This involves the resistance of muscle groups through isometric contractions (tensing) of the stretched muscles. The use of isometric stretching is one of the fastest ways to develop increased flexibility and is more effective than either passive stretching or active stretching alone. PNF (Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation): is a stretching technique that combines stretching and contracting the muscle. PNF stretching is currently the fastest and most effective way known to increase static-passive flexibility. It is not really a type of stretching but is a technique of combining passive and isometric stretching (see section Isometric Stretching) in order to achieve maximum static flexibility.    

SPARTACUS FOAM ROLLER WORKOUT #1 and #2 (VIDEO)

INTRODUCTION TO THE FOAM ROLLER A foam roller is simply a cylindrical piece of hard-celled foam. Basically, you just use your own body weight to sandwich the roller between the body’s soft tissue and the floor. The Foam is used to stretch areas that are hard to stretch and massage.   SPARTACUS FOAM ROLLER ROUTINE #1 Perform this routine before your training session or workout. Set your Gymboss Timer to 30 seconds with 10 sec transition time. Go through 1-2 rounds myofascial release. SPARTACUS FOAM ROLLER WORKOUT 2 Perform this routine before your training session or workout. Set your Gymboss Timer to 30 seconds with 10 sec transition time. Go through 1-2 rounds myofascial release.   (The goal is to roll over the specific tight muscle and with hold the position or slightly roll over the tight muscle. Like Stretching, foam rolling is NOT supposed to be painful, so ease up on the amount of pressure if it begins to get to painful. You may need a few rounds on a really tight muscle) SPARTACUS FOAM ROLLER EXERCISE LIET 1. Glutes 2:41 2. Hamstrings Both 2:54 Left 3:05 3. Hamstring Right 3:13 4. Calves Both 3:28 Calf Left 3:41 5. Calf Right 3:48 6. Hip Abductor-IT Band Right 3:54 7. Hip Abductor-IT Band Left 4:07 8. Lats Right 4:20 9. Lats Left 4:31 10. Lower Back 4:39 SPARTACUS FOAM ROLLER WORKOUT 2 1. Glutes/Hip Rotators - 2. Hip Adductor Left 3. Hip adductor Right 4. Middle Back 5. Upper Back 6. Neck 7. Triceps Left 8. Triceps Right 9. Shoulder Blades Left 10. Shoulder Blades Right The foam roller not only stretches muscles and tendons but it also breaks down soft tissue adhesions and scar tissue. This is called myofascial release. By using your own body weight and a cylindrical foam roller you can perform a self-massage or myofascial release, break up trigger points, and soothe tight fascia while increasing blood flow and circulation to the soft tissues. Your body weight provides all the pressure that you need to roll out pain, stiffness and even adhesions, or areas where connective tissue adheres to the bones. The superficial fascia is a soft connective tissue located just below the skin. It wraps and connects the muscles, bones, nerves and blood vessels of the body. Together, muscle and fascia make the myofascia system. Foam rolling can provide great benefit both before and after a workout. Whether you are getting ready to perform a Spartacus Workout or stretching routine it very important that you take the time to foam roll before you do that. So always foam roll before you stretch. Rolling after a workout may help speed up the recovery process so the next time you work out you feel fresh and ready to go. WHY I CHOSE THE FOAM ROLLER FOR THE SW2 (SPARTACUS WORKOUT 2.0) PROGRAM -OFFICIAL LAUNCH JUNE 2012 I know that the workouts are tough and can often course stiffness in the muscles, especially if you do not stretch enough. I found the Foam Roller extremely useful for me a few months back and live by this inexpensive piece of equipment. It was only natural for me to include it in the SW2 program along with a couple of massage routines to help you loosen up the fascial. BENEFITS • Inexpensive – $30 compared to the big bucks of a massage therapist • Done consistently foam rolling or self myofascial release will help you or the athletes you coach perform better for longer periods of time • The techniques are simple SHOPPING SUGGESTIONS My suggestion is to go with a high density foam roller or an EVA foam roller as they are known as the best in the market. With the cell foam, it is capable of handling weight and frequent use. Get yourself a longer roller as opposed to the shorter versions. One that’s too short will cause some issues. Avoid foam rollers that contain large gaps or pores in the foam. A quality roller will go for between $25-50 depending on what country you live in. TYPES OF FOAM ROLLERS 1. Low Density – this foam is low density and is softer; you can find this in white color but you should be aware that it will not last for a long time; this is ideal for starters 2. EVA foam – this is better than the bio-foam because it can provide you with greater pressure 3. Molded foam – a very good example is the PB Elite and you can find them in most gyms or fitness centers; high density small beads are molded to form this cylindrical roller 4. Grid – the inner core of the foam roller is hard and it has outer foam later of about one inch; this can provide you with the firmer feel that you love WHERE TO BUY YOUR FOAM ROLLER Purchase the EVA Premium Foam Roller from the Treadmill Factory (Canada only) http://www.treadmillfactory.ca/p-974-c-84-eva-premium-foam-roller-6-x-36.html

SPARTACUS SKIPPING WORKOUT FOR CONDITIONING AND FAT LOSS

Skipping or Jumping Rope is used by all athletes, especially boxers, wrestlers and MMA fighters to build co-ordination, footwork, speed and agility, improve conditioning and strengthen the legs. Others use it to increase cardio vascular capacity and burn fat. Check out this Spartacus Skipping Workout with Lady Spartan Angela See Spartacus Skipping Workout details below Jumping rope is an exercise that builds aerobic and high intensity capacity. You can easily push heart rate to its maximum if you turn the rope as fast as you can. If you go slower, you will still push harder than when you jog with a friend. So, you can get in shape faster than you could by running, swimming or cycling. Scientist find, because you are concentrating on the skill, you do not notice the pain as much. Rope jumping is fantastic if you want to improve fitness quickly, develop fast, powerful legs and shred that fat. Jump Rope training also enhances your coordination, agility, footwork, endurance and quickness. Jumping rope is a simple, inexpensive, low maintenance activity. All you need is a good pair of shoes, a rope and place to jump. When buying a rope the length is important. The rope is the right length when you can step in the middle of it and lift both ends up to your armpits. It should turn easily in your hands and not bunch up around the handles. Make sure to choose an area that is flat and not too hard. Try to avoid surfaces like hard concrete and instead go for one that is softer, or springier. My wife Angela who is also a Muay Thai fighter uses skipping as a staple in her training. Angela put together this awesome Skipping Routine that can be used as a cardio workout or a warm up before you train. For fast and highly effective fat burning, interval training is the way to go. I love this workout because I can do it anywhere, anytime, SPARTACUS SKIPPING WORKOUT After a 3-5 minute regular skip warm up, perform all 10 exercises for 60 seconds each without rest in between. That is 1 round. Complete 1-3 rounds. Spartacus Skipping Warm Up After 2 minutes regular skip, perform all 10 exercise for 30 seconds each without rest in between and add the BONUS at the end. Complete 1 round as a warm up before training or workout GET YOUR FUNK ROBERTS GYMBOSS TIMER FOR INTERVALS: http://tinyurl.com/yllwjdt GET YOUR SKIPPING ROPE FOR THE WORKOUT – http://www.treadmillfactory.ca/p-171-c–9-leather-rope.html SPARTACUS SKIPPING WORKOUT 1. Side to Side/Slalom – 1:58 2. Alternating Leg Splits (forward and back) – 2:03 3. Left Knee Raise 2:17 4. Right Knee Raise 2:27 5. Alternating Knee Raises 2:33 6. Jumping Jacks 2:42 7. Two Foot Hops 2:49 8. Twists Side to Side 2:56 9. Fighters Stance 3:03 10. Squats/Bunny Hops 3:14 1. BONUS – Sprint to the Finish 3:21 So, next time you see some kids, jumping rope or double-dutching, join in and who knows… you may end up getting your cardio done and having fun all at the same time.

3 STRETCHES TO CURE TIGHT HIP FLEXORS

          Funk and Steve Delaney of PhysioMed http://www.phisiomed.ca  take you through 3 stretches to help with hip flexibility, knee problems and bad lower back. Do these stretched BEFORE you train and after a quick warm up to open and loosen up the hips. I used these stretched to help me win my first Pro Muay Thai fight. If I did not use these stretches, there is NO way I would have been able to kick at all (I have tight hips)